Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
The Lebanese Flag flies high at the North Pole
One Small Step for Maxime, One Large Step for Lebanon

Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
The Lebanese Flag at the North Pole (Image #2)

Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
Bank Audi Flag at the North Pole – Grow Beyond Your Potential

Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
The flag from the Academy of Natural Sciences.
Robert Peary and Matthew Henson carried a similar flag from the Academy 100 years ago.

Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
GPS showing the coordinates of the North Pole (90 Degrees North!)
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Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
the last mile

Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
the last swim




Today, Saturday April 25 2009, at 18:22 Beirut Time we reached the North Pole. SUCCESS!!!

We are very, very excited, relieved, satisfied and ready to rest. I can’t wait to sit in a chair and get dressed standing up. Stuart sounds great, and Lonnie is very pleased.

Wow! What an accomplishment… what a feeling of satisfaction… what an amazing journey. Over the last 53 days we have endured so many challenges:

-60 degree temperatures, howling winds, rough terrain, icy water and worst of all, southerly drift.

We figure that all-in-all we skied close to 1200 kilometers (650 nautical miles) from start to finish.

Though we ate more than 8,000 calories a day, we lost an average of half a kilogram (1.25 pounds) per person every 2 days. A the end, even our shadows looked skinny!

We will gather with PolarExplorers’ other North Pole expeditions for a delicious celebratory feast in Longyearbyen, Spitsbergen tomorrow (Sunday night).

Our current and last position: 90 Degrees North – the Top of the World




Maxime Chaya via Iridium
Day 53 – Success at the North Pole



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Stuart Smith – Team Member
Day 53 – Success at the North Pole



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Lonnie Dupre – Team Leader
Day 53 – Success at the North Pole



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Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
Quick Lunch Stop midst a Massive Whiteout

A steady wind straight out of the north is blowing. This does two things:

First, it blows in your face all day long making it feel a bit “raw” on the nose and cheeks.

Second, and perhaps worse, it pushes you south as you ski north. Though we clocked 12 nautical miles north today, we probably skied closer to 17 miles.

The “polar treadmill” likely stole 5 miles of our hard earned travel over the course of the day. When we sleep we are also drifting to the south. So what we really want and need is for the wind to stop blowing and the drift to calm down.

Despite the challenges, we remain in good spirits, and are looking forward to reaching 90 degrees.

We crossed 3 leads today, all of them in a state of motion, either closing before our very eyes, or opening and becoming wider.
It is very exciting and awe inspiring to see the ice in motion. What a force!

Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
Fresh Open Lead!

We are at N88.45.51, W66.15.42.

The wind was out of the WSW at about 20 mph which made the day feel quite raw even though the temperature was only around -8F.

We crossed 1 fresh crack, but otherwise had a mix of rubble and pans.

We will start longer days today for our final push to the pole. We hope to cross 89 degrees tomorrow!

Maxime Chaya via Iridium
Day 45





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Maxime Chaya - North Pole Expedition
Open Lead freezing over

We made great mileage on a beautiful day, but also crossed 2 big leads (one about 1.5 miles wide!)…

On the wider lead we were able to find ice that covered most of the lead, but not all of it. For the remaining 35 feet or so, we used a combination of dry suit and catamaraning our sleds to get across. This provided quite a bit of excitement, but hopefully we won’t see too many more!

We made 13.3 nautical miles in 10 hours (25 kilometers!!!).

Our current position in degrees, minutes and seconds is N86.34.30, W78.15.36.

Maxime Chaya via Iridium
Day 33 Briefing in English





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We had some very unusual weather yesterday night…

Despite the unusual conditions, we progressed past several open leads which we had to detour around. These are the first significant open water leads that we have encountered. One lead in particular took almost 2 hours to get around.

The temperature was a chilly -34F and it was quite windy, so despite the clear skies, the day was very challenging.

We are happy to have covered 7.4 nautical miles of northerly progress. Their position in degrees, minutes and seconds is N85.40.08, W79.06.48.

Maxime Chaya via Iridium
Day 28 Briefing in English





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